Owners of General Motors vehicles in Kentucky have probably heard about the millions of cars that were recalled last year. In February 2014, GM recalled 2.6 million cars due to faulty ignition switches. Now, people who were criminally charged for unexplained auto accidents involving GM cars are claiming that they were wrongfully convicted.

GM was not the only car manufacturer that issued recalls last year. In the United States alone, a total of 64 million cars were recalled in 2014. Many of the vehicles that were recalled had been driven for 10 or more years, and GM has been accused of waiting to issue a public notice about the defective ignition switch for that long. A University of Michigan law professor commented that everyone who has been convicted of a crime involving a recalled GM vehicle could argue that a faulty ignition switch caused the accident.

One woman who was charged with involuntary manslaughter for a fatal crash in September 2010 says that her Chevrolet Cobalt completely stopped working while she was driving. After pleading guilty to the charge and serving three months in jail, the woman’s guilty plea was erased in August 2015 because of the new evidence about the faulty ignition switches on GM vehicles.

A person who was involved in an accident involving a GM car or another recalled vehicle may want to discuss the details of the auto accident with an attorney. An attorney may be able to investigate the crash to determine if there is evidence that a defective vehicle part contributed to the accident. If a recalled vehicle was to blame for an accident, the accident victims may be able to pursue financial compensation from the vehicle manufacturer.