Taliaferro, Carran, & Hampton, PLLC
Call Today for a Consultation
Local: 859-757-4926 | Toll Free: 866-959-1943
Taliaferro, Carran, & Hampton, PLLC
Call Today for a Consultation

Local: 859-757-4926 | Toll Free: 866-959-1943

A Law Firm For Real 
Life And Real People

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Truck Accidents
  4.  » Sharing the road: Large truck no-zones

Sharing the road: Large truck no-zones

Many drivers have dealt with blind spots while behind the wheel, but few recognize the size of large trucks’ blind spots and what that means for them while sharing the road. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, one-third of trucking accidents involving passenger vehicles occur in blind spots.

Understanding the blind spots of large trucks and how to avoid them may help drivers avoid some trucking accidents.

Knowing the no-zones

According to the Kentucky Department of Transportation, large trucks have blind spots on all four sides. Commonly referred to as no-zones, these areas may extend up to 20-feet to the front of commercial trucks and up to 30-feet to the rear. The blind spots may extend across two traffic lanes down the ride sides of large trucks, as well as across one traffic lane down their left sides.

Avoiding blind spots

Drivers may take precautions when sharing the road with large trucks to avoid blind spot accidents. For example, this may include refraining from tailgating and allowing trucks plenty of room to pass to keep their vehicles out of the no-zones or to move through them as quickly as possible. Motorists may also find it helpful to make sure they have ample clear road in front of them before passing large trucks to avoid moving into commercial trucks’ front blind spots. Staying out of the no-zones may help prevent some potentially serious or deadly collisions involving large trucks and smaller, passenger vehicles.

Getting into truck accidents may leave people with serious, costly injuries. However, those who suffer such injuries have options for pursuing compensatory damages for their injury-associated losses.

Archives

FindLaw Network